Disability Overview

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A disability can be defined as any physical condition or activity that is substantially impaired relative the normal functioning of an individual or group. A person’s ability to perform is also called disability. It can be sensory disability (motor disability), cognitive disability, emotional disorder, cognitive disability, and others. Learning disabilities, mental illnesses, social problems, and physiological conditions can all be considered as disability.

Disability Overview

The most common type is psychological disability. It is composed of several psychological symptoms, such as anxiety, mood disorders and paranoia. Neuropsychological diseases are neurological conditions that impact brain activity. Multiple sclerosis (MS), strokes, Parkinson’s disease/PDD, cerebral palsy (CP) and other neurological conditions can all lead to disability.

Disability Overview

Another type of disability that can be caused by injury or illness is bodily/muscular impairment. Body system disorders include categories such as muscular dystrophy, spasticity, paralysis, joint dysfunction, congenital anomalies, autoimmune disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, and others. These disabilities include HIV/AIDS, multiple sclerosis, strokes, heart disease, cerebral palsy and blindness. Neurological disorders affect brain function via chemical imbalances in brain or nervous system. Chemical imbalances can be caused by alcohol abuse, prescription drug abuse and caffeine abuse, as well as marijuana use.

Disability Overview

A combination of any three of the above types of disability can result is a disability. The types of disability differ as they are based on severity or impairment. For example, a person with a severe sensory impairment would have a greater difficulty with fine motor movement. On the other side, a person with mild or moderate sensory impairment would have difficulty with simple tasks. The function and severity of the disability will depend on the individual. This means that it may be difficult to perform certain tasks of daily living, such eating, bathing, or dressing.

Top Tips on How to Live with a Disability

The invisible disability, or psychological handicap, has little or no impact on a person’s daily living. While some may think that this type of disability is due to a past trauma or other factors, it can happen at any age. For example, a child with Down syndrome may suffer from the mental impairment called dyslexia. The disability is often referred as “Down syndrome” in these cases.

The three types of disabilities described above are often grouped together under the heading of a neurological disorder. Multiple sclerosis (MS), Lou Gehrig’s Disease (Mou Gehrig), Parkinson’s, Lou Gehrig’s, stroke, heart disease, traumatic head injury, and other disabilities are all included. These types of disorders can have different causes, effects, and symptoms. These include infections and neurological disorders, birth defects, strokes, among others.

An impairment can affect a person’s ability and willingness to participate in daily activities. It can reduce a person’s ability to perform basic motor-based tasks or prevent them from performing the most basic tasks. A disability can also result in participation restrictions, which may limit the individual’s ability enjoy the simple things in life.

Each disability will have an impact on a person’s ability to do something. This is based on its particular causes and effects. Some disabilities are more obvious then others. Physical impairments, for example, will often result in restriction of activity. Participation restrictions can also be caused by mental or emotional impairments. The underlying cause of the condition will determine the extent and type of impairment.

Mental and emotional disabilities can be difficult to diagnose. These disabilities can range in severity from mild to severe. Some may also be classified as learning disabilities. These people require special accommodations to be able participate in most daily activities. Common accommodations include the need for crutches or a wheel chair, and requests to receive specialized assistance. Children with visual impairments may also be granted differential accommodations.

Blindness and other forms of physical disability fall under two broad categories: permanent or disabling. Permanent disabilities are often due to illness or disease, or the residual effects from past medical treatments. Examples of this include stroke, heart disease, and cerebral palsy. A disabling condition is usually indicated by symptoms such as extreme pain or swelling, walking or rising with difficulty, unable to dress themselves, and marked limitation to one’s daily activities.

These impairments are rapidly increasing in prevalence. Canada’s disabled population is estimated to be five percent. This is a significant increase over previous years. Although the actual numbers might be lower, the impact it has on society as a whole cannot be ignored. Many people live in constant fear of becoming disabled. Many businesses are now realizing the importance to include specially-abled workers in their workforce.

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